Classifieds | Archives | Jobs | About TGT | Contact | Subscribe
Last updated 23 minutes ago
Printer Friendly Version | TGT@Twitter | RSS Feed |
Son ‘forgives’ rail engineer for Grayrigg train crash
October 30, 2012
 Print    Send to Friend

LONDON: The son of a woman killed in the Grayrigg train crash in Cumbria says he has forgiven the engineer who forgot to check the tracks, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) has reported.

Margaret Masson, 84, of Glasgow, died after the Virgin train derailed on the West Coast main line in February 2007.

The train went over a “degraded” set of points and careered down an embankment, leaving 88 people injured, including two members of the train crew.

Dave Lewis, a maintenance manager at Network Rail, admitted at a hearing that he was “under pressure” and had forgotten to inspect the points near where the train derailed.

Now, five years after the crash, the BBC brought Lewis and Masson’s son George together to “close a chapter” in their lives.

Speaking about the day he heard the news about his mother, Masson said: “My son rang me at my office and said: ‘Sit down’. “I said: ‘What’s wrong?’ He said: ‘Mum’s been killed’. I just broke down then.”

The following day, Masson and his family went to the crash site.

He said: “We actually saw the train and where my mum was. We stayed there about half an hour.”

At an inquest in November 2011, Lewis said he had been “under pressure” when he failed to patrol a section of the West Coast main line five days before the crash.

He said he had felt like a man “spinning plates on sticks.”

The hearing was told how Lewis had sent an email to his bosses one year before the crash, in which he described the inspection system as a “shambles.”

The jurors heard how an inquiry ruled the “immediate cause” of the crash was that the train had gone over a “degraded and unsafe” set of points, known as Lambrigg 2B.

One of three stretcher bars, which keep moving rails a set distance apart, was missing while the other two were fractured and bolts were missing.

They also heard how Lewis and his team were under-staffed, with workers not given the right tools or enough time to carry out checks.

Lewis said: “I realised what I should have done the weekend prior and I just said to one of our senior managers: ‘That is down to me. Nobody else, that’s me’.

“I would say not a week goes by when I don’t think: ‘If only I’d done that’.”


Add this page to your favorite Social Bookmarking websites
Post a comment
Related Stories
Rapper shot at, posts video on FB
LONDON: You might have thought you’ve seen everything on Facebook but this video is a reminder that almost everything in life can be documented — even being shot in the h..
Surge in child abuse cases involving witchcraft: Police
LONDON: An increasing number of child abuse cases involving accusations of witchcraft and exorcism are being reported to police. In one incident, a boy of nine was cal..
‘Deradicalisation’ referrals on rise, says report
LONDON: Almost 800 people in Britain were referred over three months to an anti-terrorism “deradicalisation” programme, many of them minors, figures published on Thursday..
Protesters storm premiere of Suffragette
LONDON: Protesters stormed the red carpet at the glitzy premiere of the film Suffragette on Wednesday that stars Meryl Streep as a leading British women’s rights activist..
Complaints about police reach record levels
LONDON: Complaints about police have reached record levels, figures show. There were 37,105 complaints from members of the public against forces in England and Wales ..
Advertise | Copyright