Classifieds | Archives | Jobs | About TGT | Contact | Subscribe
 | 
Last updated 6 hours, 11 minutes ago
Printer Friendly Version | TGT@Twitter | RSS Feed |
HOME LOCAL MIDEAST ASIA WORLD BUSINESS SPORT OPINION WRITERS
Government taken to HC over ‘toxic’ school census
December 08, 2017
 Print    Send to Friend

LONDON: The government is facing a legal challenge in the High Court over its decision to collect data on school pupils’ nationality and country of birth.

Since last September, guardians and carers in England have been asked to state whether their children are foreign nationals as part of the school census.

It emerged shortly after the policy was introduced that the Department of Education (DfE) had agreed to share the personal details of up to 1,500 schoolchildren a month with the Home Office, as part of the Prime Minister’s “hostile environment” agenda towards migrants.

Campaign group Against Borders for Children (ABC), which is bringing forward the case represented by human rights group Liberty, argues that the new policy should be overturned because it is a violation of the rights of children and their families to a private life.

The group says it is unlawful that parents were not told the data would be shared with the Home Office, and argues that the collection of the data serves no identifiable educational purpose.

The policy sparked a widespread backlash when it was introduced last year, with cross-party MPs labelling the system “racist” after schools were found to be demanding parents hand over passports as proof of their children’s nationality.

It has been condemned by the House of Lords and by numerous organisations, including the National Education Union, Privacy International, the Refugee Council and Liberty.

Following pressure, ministers dropped plans to introduce ethnicity and nationality data collection for nursery school-age children last year, but the census continues to take place in primary and secondary schools.

The Independent revealed last year that schools were being told to guess the ethnicity of pupils and collect their passport numbers and expiry dates as part of the controversial new policy.

The legal challenge, which will begin with the issuing of proceedings at the High Court in London on Thursday, has been supported by a crowdfunding campaign launched last month on CrowdJustice, which has so far raised more than £4,000.

The Independent

Add this page to your favorite Social Bookmarking websites
Comments
 
Post a comment
 
Name:
Country:
City:
Email:
Comment:
 
    
    
FRONTPAGE
 
GALLERY
 
PANORAMA
 
TIME OUT
 
SPORT
 
 
Advertise | Copyright