Classifieds | Archives | Jobs | About TGT | Contact | Subscribe
 | 
Last updated 6 hours, 17 minutes ago
Printer Friendly Version | TGT@Twitter | RSS Feed |
HOME LOCAL MIDEAST ASIA WORLD BUSINESS SPORT OPINION WRITERS
Climber recalls horror descent from ‘killer mountain’
February 02, 2018
 Print    Send to Friend

Sallanches: A French mountaineer who was rescued in a dramatic night-time operation on Pakistan’s “killer mountain” has told how she had to leave her weak and bleeding climbing partner and descend the peak alone in darkness.

Elisabeth Revol, speaking exclusively to AFP from a hospital in France’s Haute-Savoie region — where doctors are assessing whether she will require amputations due to frostbite in her hands and left foot -- said rescuers urged her to leave behind Tomek (Tomasz) Mackiewicz, a Polish national.

She earlier described the decision as “terrible and painful”.

It was Revol’s fourth attempt, her third with Mackiewicz, to scale the 8,125-metre (26,660-foot) Nanga Parbat during the winter season, when they ran into trouble amid frigid temperatures and high winds.

An elite group of Polish climbers managed to reach Revol but were unable to get to Mackiewicz, who was stranded further up the mountain.

Revol, who weighed just 43 kilogrammes (95 pounds) following her ordeal, left France on December 15 and began her adventure with Mackiewicz on January 20.

A few days later, as they approached the summit, she says they “felt good”. By early evening they finally reached the peak — making Revol the first woman to scale the mountain in winter, without oxygen or sherpa.

But their joy was shortlived.

“Tomek told me ‘I can’t see anything any more,’” Revol recalled.

“He hadn’t used a mask because it was a bit hazy during the day and by nightfall he had ophthalmia (an inflammation of the eye). We hardly had a second at the top. We had to rush to get down.”

Mackiewicz clung to Revol’s shoulders and they began the long, difficult descent in darkness.

“At one point, he couldn’t breathe,” Revol said. “He took off the protection he had in front of his mouth and he began to freeze. His nose became white and then his hands, his feet.”

They huddled overnight in a crevasse, trying desperately to shelter from the biting wind. But Mackiewicz no longer had the strength to continue the descent and by sunrise, his condition had deteriorated further.

Revol recalls that he had “blood streaming from his mouth”, a sign of oedema -- a buildup of fluid in the body and the ultimate stage of acute mountain sickness, which can be fatal without urgent treatment.

Agence France-Presse

Add this page to your favorite Social Bookmarking websites
Comments
 
Post a comment
 
Name:
Country:
City:
Email:
Comment:
 
    
    
Related Stories
Climate change multiplies harmful marine heatwaves
Paris: The number of days marked by potentially destructive ocean heatwaves has doubled in 35 years, and will multiply another five-fold at current rates of climate chang..
1,800 evacuated as France defuses British WWII bomb
Rennes: Some 1,800 people were ordered to evacuate their homes in northwest France on Sunday as a bomb squad defused a British bomb from World War II, officials said. ..
France to set penalties on non-recycled plastic
Paris: France plans to introduce a penalty system next year that would increase the costs of consumer goods with packaging made of non-recycled plastic, part of a pledge ..
2 Germans indicted in France over flooded youth campground
MARSEILLE: Two Germans have been charged for causing unintentional injury and endangering the lives of others after they brought a group of teenagers to an unauthorised c..
‘Blood moon’ dazzles skygazers across the world
Paris: The longest “blood moon” eclipse this century dazzled skygazers across the globe late on Friday, coinciding with Mars’ closest approach in 15 years in a thrilling ..
FRONTPAGE
 
GALLERY
 
PANORAMA
 
TIME OUT
 
SPORT
 
 
Advertise | Copyright