Classifieds | Archives | Jobs | About TGT | Contact | Subscribe
 | 
Last updated 24 minutes ago
Printer Friendly Version | TGT@Twitter | RSS Feed |
HOME LOCAL MIDEAST ASIA WORLD BUSINESS SPORT OPINION WRITERS
British press braces for ethics inquiry report
November 23, 2012
 Print    Send to Friend

LONDON: The Leveson inquiry into press standards in Britain, set up after the phone-hacking scandal at the News of the World tabloid, will publish its findings on Nov.29, it was announced on Thursday.

Former senior judge Brian Leveson will unveil his hotly anticipated proposals for regulation of the newspaper industry, whose reputation has been hit hard in the past year by revelations of hacking and allegations of bribery.

Prime Minister David Cameron will respond immediately to the report with a statement to parliament, but he has already said that maintaining the current system of self-regulation of the press “is not an option.”

Newspaper editors are braced for strong criticism after receiving letters from the inquiry this summer giving them an indication of the inquiry’s findings.

Chris Blackhurst, the editor of the Independent, said they amounted to “basically a point-by-point demolition of the industry.”

Cameron set up the inquiry in July 2011 following the revelation that the Rupert Murdoch-owned News of the World had engaged in widespread phone hacking, including targeting a missing teenage girl who was later found murdered.

Murdoch responded to public outrage by dramatically closing the 168-year-old tabloid, but his media empire has continued to be hit by a wave of arrests over hacking and bribery, and the prospect of two high-profile trials.

Leveson will look into the hacking scandal after the police investigations are complete, but his first task was to examine the culture, practices and ethics of the press, specifically its relationship with the public, police and politicians.

During ten months of televised public hearings, the former judge heard from politicians including Cameron himself, newspaper barons including Murdoch, police chiefs, journalists, hacking victims and celebrities.

Leveson has previously indicated that he wants any new regulatory body to be independent of the establishment and the press and to be able to provide redress for those wronged and a swift resolution of privacy and libel disputes.

Cameron will see the report before it is published, but he has already said that he is minded to implement its recommendations.

Agence France-Presse
 

Add this page to your favorite Social Bookmarking websites
Comments
 
Post a comment
 
Name:
Country:
City:
Email:
Comment:
 
    
    
Related Stories
Foley killer will be caught: Ex-MI6 chief
LONDON: The suspected British killer of US journalist James Foley will be found and brought to justice “sooner or later,” Britain’s former anti-terrorism chief said on Th..
Suicide tourism numbers double, say experts
LONDON: Suicide tourism is on the rise, experts said after they found that the number of people travelling to Switzerland to take their own lives had doubled in four year..
Officers probed over improper use of social media
LONDON: Hundreds of police officers in England and Wales have been investigated for improper use of social media from 2009 to February this year. Officers and police s..
Robbers beat up pensioner
LONDON: A terminally-ill pensioner was beaten up by robbers in a “cowardly attack” as he walked home from the pub. Police do not believe the offenders knew their 69-ye..
BBC breached editorial rules in Cliff leak: Police
LONDON: South Yorkshire Police has complained to the BBC and accused it of breaching its own editorial guidelines after the broadcaster found out about a search the force..
 
FRONTPAGE
 
GALLERY
 
PANORAMA
 
TIME OUT
 
SPORT
 
 
Advertise | Copyright